Postal Museum

There is a hidden Museum in Budapest which is a worth to visit for both young and old. It is close to the famous Heroe's square. Postal Museum takes you back in the past.

Nowadays in this world where the technology is so advanced everything is faster and easier. You can check almost everything on your smart phone in a second. This museum is a real time travel. The Postal Museum gives you experiences to get to know how the post offices and postal services worked in the past. It is funny that we have an advanced world but we can not live without the services of post office.

The collection of the museum goes back to 1881 and relies on various items from the postal history. As you entrance to the hall of the museum you will bump to a stamp vending machine where people can take a picture with a virtual 3D postman and take it home if they wish. Next room gives a place for an old postal van that was used for delivering mails. Not only it can be seen but you can sit inside and experience what it was like to drive a vehicle like this. Near to the van there is a tricycle that was used for mail collecting built by Csonka János.

In the museum mannequins are dressed in postman uniforms to see what kind of uniform they used to have and of course because of the experience to make it real. There is a post office where you can feel yourself in a real office. They made it as it is still working. There are letters and packages, mailboxes and a still fuctioning mailing tube.

The Hungarian Royal Post has been an innovatiove institution from its beginnings. It created the possibility of employment for women first, providing the chance fo an independent existence.
The Hungarian and the Austrian Post were the first to introduce picture postcards in 1869. There are collections where we can see the first Hungarian-published postcards, the bag locks and the machine-emptied post box.

For kids this museum can be enjoyable also. They can learn while they have fun. Try out some old ways to write, like the reed pen, quill-pen and can seal the envelopes with wax. They will learn how letter were transpotted from sender to receiver while older children can try out the Morses-coded messages.

The building is another stunning thing you should admire while wander in the Museum. Lajos Egyedi a wealthy factory owner and horse breeder built the Egyedi Palace in 1896-1897. The Neo-Renaissance building was originally built as a residence and has been housing the Postal Museum, since 2012. The building is like a mansion, with glided ceilings, chandeliers and stained glass windows.

Adress : Budapest, 1068 Benczúr utca 27.

Log in